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Kaye Kerr Physiotherapist BrisbaneKaye graduated from the University of Qld in 1983 with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy. She worked in Canberra, Sydney, London, Lincoln and Redcliffe before starting her first practice in 1989.

Kaye always had an interest in how many aspects of health it took to support physical recovery from injury. This led her to investigate a much more holistic approach to Physiotherapy. During her work with amputees in Sydney, she realised that motivation led to amazing recovery in some people. This led her to investigate the psychological aspect of recovery and she went on to study Hypnotherapy, gaining a Diploma of Medical Hypnosis” in 1985. Kaye then investigated the contribution that Chinese Medicine had to offer and completed a 4 year Diploma of Acupuncture in 1990 and a Research Thesis in Acupuncture at the University of Qld in 1993, the topic being “The Effect of Acupuncture on the Sympathetic Nervous System”. Kaye is also a qualified Pilates Instructor and never stops updating her education.

Kaye commenced practice in Caboolture in 1989 and is now the Principal Physiotherapist of Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre.

Kaye has also played an active role in the Australian Physiotherapy Association since 1999 and was Chair of the Queensland Private Practitioner’s Group for several years.. Her clinical interests span many areas but she has a special interest in the multi-modality treatment of pain. Kaye enjoys seeing those clients with complex problems and finds satisfaction helping those people regain a meaningful and happy life. It is 24 years this year since Kaye Kerr started her first practice in Caboolture. She says that it is the reward in seeing how lives change when people get rid of their pain or learn how to walk again or function independently that keeps her doing what she does.

Kaye has a keen interest in sport including playing basketball, kayaking and outrigging. She enjoys life with her husband Glenn and children Jacob and Connie and Joseph.

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Here are my most recent posts:

On sport injury trends: A Q&A with Kaye Kerr

Kaye, you just celebrated 30 years at Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre. What are the trends you have seen in sports injuries over the years? A big one is the increase in the intensity of training, competition and commitment. Most people my age would have played plenty of sport at school, or for a local club for 1-2 hours a couple of days a week when they were young. We get more exercise doing household chores, climbing trees and playing backyard...

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Exercising and playing sport in the warmer months

As we move from the cooler to the warmer months, we start to consider the impact that the heat can have on the way our body functions when we play sport. However, it should be acknowledged that heat illness can occur even in the cooler weather, after exercising for more than 45 minutes at high intensity. What temperatures should we be concerned about? The guidelines for exercising in the heat suggest that 26-30 degrees produce a moderate to high risk...

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Shoulder Instability

What is it? Shoulder instability is a term used to describe a weakness in the structures of the shoulder that keep the joint stable, often leading to frequent dislocations. As one of the most flexible joints in the body, the shoulder maintains stability through a balance of support between the dynamic structures (muscles and tendons) and static structures (ligaments and joint shape). Shoulder instability typically occurs in one of two directions, anterior (forward) or posterior (backwards), anterior instability or dislocations...

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What Is Frozen Shoulder?

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition affecting the joint capsule of the shoulder. It is characterised by inflammation of the capsule, leading to pain and stiffness with shoulder movements.  Frozen shoulder is categorised as either primary or secondary. Primary frozen shoulder occurs for no clear reason, while secondary frozen shoulder develops following an injury or surgery of the joint. Frozen shoulder usually follows a typical pattern and can be separated into three stages, freezing, frozen and...

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Plantar Fasciitis

What is it? Plantar fasciitis is a common condition of the foot and heel affecting both athletes and members of the general public. The plantar fascia is a fibrous band of tissue that attaches to the base of the heel and supports the muscles and arch on the base of the foot. When the plantar fascia becomes chronically irritated, it is referred to as plantar fasciitis. What are the symptoms? Plantar fasciitis is characterised by pain at the base of...

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