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Kaye Kerr Physiotherapist BrisbaneKaye graduated from the University of Qld in 1983 with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy. She worked in Canberra, Sydney, London, Lincoln and Redcliffe before starting her first practice in 1989.

Kaye always had an interest in how many aspects of health it took to support physical recovery from injury. This led her to investigate a much more holistic approach to Physiotherapy. During her work with amputees in Sydney, she realised that motivation led to amazing recovery in some people. This led her to investigate the psychological aspect of recovery and she went on to study Hypnotherapy, gaining a Diploma of Medical Hypnosis” in 1985. Kaye then investigated the contribution that Chinese Medicine had to offer and completed a 4 year Diploma of Acupuncture in 1990 and a Research Thesis in Acupuncture at the University of Qld in 1993, the topic being “The Effect of Acupuncture on the Sympathetic Nervous System”. Kaye is also a qualified Pilates Instructor and never stops updating her education.

Kaye commenced practice in Caboolture in 1989 and is now the Principal Physiotherapist of Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre.

Kaye has also played an active role in the Australian Physiotherapy Association since 1999 and was Chair of the Queensland Private Practitioner’s Group for several years.. Her clinical interests span many areas but she has a special interest in the multi-modality treatment of pain. Kaye enjoys seeing those clients with complex problems and finds satisfaction helping those people regain a meaningful and happy life. It is 24 years this year since Kaye Kerr started her first practice in Caboolture. She says that it is the reward in seeing how lives change when people get rid of their pain or learn how to walk again or function independently that keeps her doing what she does.

Kaye has a keen interest in sport including playing basketball, kayaking and outrigging. She enjoys life with her husband Glenn and children Jacob and Connie and Joseph.

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Here are my most recent posts:

Physio Tips: How to help your kids stay active

Research shows that many children today are struggling to meet their daily-recommended targets for physical activity. We know that inactivity is a risk factor for a multitude of chronic diseases and many of the habits that shape our adult lives are set in childhood.

Physical activity is important for a growing body as movement and weight bearing have a large impact on bone strength, muscle and tendon health. Here are some tips to make sure your child is staying as active as possible.

1. Find an activity that suits your child’s personality and abilities.

Children who are very coordinated and excel in competition may find team sports both increase their self-esteem as well as keep them fit. For other children, being a part of a team can cause embarrassment and they may say they dislike exercise, when in fact what they dislike is feeling like a failure and letting down the team.

These children may prefer a sport where success measured by improving their own performance, rather than being compared to other children. Surfing, yoga, martial arts, dancing or gymnastics may be activities that suit your child if competitive and team sports cause them to be discouraged.

2. Do get injuries checked out by a professional and invest in proper rehabilitation.

While children do bounce back quickly from injuries, they also may have difficulty expressing themselves and their worries when they have pain. A niggling pain that won’t go away may cause your child to say “I don’t like sport” rather than mentioning that they are in pain.

Some children may retain worries that they will hurt themselves again because of a previous injury and avoid exercise because they don’t feel completely confident.  Your physiotherapist can help to identify any issues that your child is having and help to resolve them.

3. Set fun and challenging goals for them to complete during their daily routine.

As fewer children are walking and riding to school, try to find ways to fit extra activities into the day. Have a daily long jump competition in the backyard at the same time each day or have bed making time trials. Have a routine before bed of age-appropriate exercises, such as star jumps, hopping, balancing and running on the spot. You can make this part of the night or morning ritual, just like brushing your teeth.

Talk to your physiotherapist for more tips on how to increase your child’s activity levels. Finding an activity that matches your child’s age level is key to keeping them engaged and active.

None of the information in this article is a replacement for proper medical advice. Always see a medical professional for advice on your individual injury.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Lumbar Disc Degeneration: Overview, Causes, and Symptoms

What is it?

The discs of the spine sit between the vertebral bodies and act as shock absorbers for the spine. In the lumbar spine the outer part of the disc is made up of thick fibrous rings called the annulus fibrosus and the inner part is a soft jelly-like substance called the nucleus pulposus. The discs in the spine also move to allow flexibility and movement of the spine, particularly in the lumbar spine where they are the largest.

As we age, our discs begin to dehydrate, losing height, elasticity, and flexibility. The result is a spine that can feel stiffer, less flexible and a bit sore with certain movements. While almost everyone will have some degree of degeneration into their later years, not everyone will experience symptoms.

What are the Symptoms?

The most commonly felt symptoms of disc degeneration are stiffness and pain in the lower back. The pain is usually felt over the spine where the disc degeneration has occurred, but also often radiates into the buttock region. In severe cases of disc degeneration, increased wear and tear can cause bony spurs to develop on the vertebral body. These spurs can cause muscle weakness, numbness and tingling sensations in the leg and foot if they place pressure on the nerves around the spine.

How does this happen?

Disc degeneration usually affects people over the age of 50, however symptoms can begin in your 30s. As we age, all of our tissues gradually lose collagen and elastin, in the spinal discs this process results in smaller, less flexible discs. Repetitive activities like bending on the waist to lift heavy objects and prolonged sitting also cause additional wear and tear of the discs and amplify the degenerative process.

How Can Physiotherapy Help?

Imaging such as MRI and XRAY can help determine the level of degeneration that has occurred with increasing accuracy, however in recent years research has shown that the level of degeneration that can be seen In imaging cannot reliably predict the amount of pain a person will experience. This can be confusing for patients and getting scans that show large amounts of degeneration can be a distressing experience, regardless of symptoms, making patients feel helpless.

Physiotherapy can help patients return to their normal activities as soon as possible and regain optimal function for their individual presentation. In addition, physiotherapy helps patients to manage their pain by helping them understand their pathology and, strengthen trunk stabilisers to prevent recurrence of any injury.

The information in this article is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Always see a medical professional for advice on your individual injury.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Talking Bones on World Osteoporosis Day

October 20, 2017, marks World Osteoporosis Day. This year the campaign theme is ‘Love your Bones: Protect your Future”.

I’d like to inform the Caboolture community about the health risks of osteoporosis, which are significant, and raise awareness for positive steps towards good bone health.

With one in three women, and one in five men being affected by bone fractures annually, osteoporosis is a world health problem, and it’s growing! By 2022, it is estimated there will be 1.27 million older Queenslanders with low bone mass, which is an increase of 39% from 2012. Among Queenslanders aged 50 years and older in this year’s survey, 14% had osteoporosis and 52% have osteopenia.

In 2017 there will be 88 fractures each day among older adults in Queensland. This year alone, the cost to Queenslanders of osteoporosis and osteopenia is estimated to be around 611 million dollars.

What is osteoporosis? It is a disease that is caused by a loss of bone minerals, making bone become brittle, leading to a higher risk of breaks than in a normal bone.

Can it be stopped? It is possible! Anyone over 50 who has had a fracture from a minor injury should be investigated for osteoporosis. Women over 50 who have one of these fractures are four times more likely to have another fracture the next year. When undiagnosed, Osteoporosis can take a heavy toll on an individual’s independence, mobility, and quality of life, especially when left untreated.

Information is crucial to the prevention of osteoporosis and to achieving a good life with osteoporosis. Treatment often involves mineral supplements, hormone replacement, and medications. But the real quality of life outcomes come from management by diet, exercise, fall’s prevention strategies and training, and the recovery of good movement without pain. For this, the best evidence-based approach is with the combined efforts of a trained Physiotherapist, Exercise Physiologist and Dietician, to get you out of pain, into exercise, functional again in your community, and feeling healthy again.

At Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre, our specialised Osteoporosis Prevention team of Kaye Kerr (Physiotherapist), Alex McGee (Exercise Physiologist) and Cathy Lowe (Dietician), are here to help!

Get in touch today.

 

 

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Achilles Tendon Injuries (Tear, Rupture) Causes, Symptoms, Treatments

What is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a band of fibrous tissue located at the back of the ankle. Its main role is to connect the calf muscles to the heel of the foot. This is the largest tendon in the body and when it tightens, as the calf muscles contract, it pulls the heel allowing you to stand on tiptoe or to point your foot.

Achilles tendon tears commonly occur in athletes. However, this injury can affect anyone and surprisingly, a complete tear is more common than a partial tear.

Tears usually occur at the section of the tendon where blood flow is poorest – about 6cm above its attachment to the heel.

What are the Symptoms?

Primarily, an Achilles tendon tear will make activities like walking, running and jumping quite difficult. Other signs and symptoms of an Achilles tendon tear include:

  • A loud pop or snap
  • Sudden and severe pain in the back of the calf or ankle
  • Feeling of having been kicked in the calf
  • There is a gap between the tendon and the heel (about 2 inches above the heel)
  • Swelling and stiffness followed by weakness and bruising
  • Difficulty walking, especially during push off
  • Standing on tiptoe may be impossible

What Causes an Achilles Tear?

Anyone can tear their Achilles tendon if the tendon is subject to excessive force or overstretching. But some factors can increase your risk of injury. The most common activities that cause this injury are running and jumping.

The Achilles tendon can thin and weaken, both as we age and if underused. As a result of this weakening, it becomes prone to tear or rupture with less force or stretching required. A tear of the Achilles often occurs in people with pre-existing Achilles tendinitis. Other factors such as certain medications (incl. antibiotics and steroids) and some illnesses (i.e. diabetes and arthritis) can also result in weakness of the tendon, increasing injury risk. Being obese is also a risk factor as excess weight puts excess strain on the tendon.

How Can Physiotherapy Help?

Treatment for Achilles tendon tear will depend on your age, how severe the injury is and your usual level of activity. Young people – especially athletes – opt to have surgery, while older people generally choose conservative treatments like physiotherapy.

Physiotherapy treatment for an Achilles tendon tear will involve exercises to strengthen the calf muscles and the Achilles tendon and exercises for stability. Many people are able to return to their normal activities within 4-6 months. Functional rehabilitation would also be part of the program as this focuses on how you move and coordinate your body. The aim would be to help you return to your highest level of performance.

This information is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Always see a medical professional for advice on your individual condition.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Osteoporosis – What is it and how can your Physiotherapist help?

Osteoporosis is a condition characterised by very low bone mass or density. Low bone mass can occur when the body loses too much bone, doesn’t make enough – or both. Osteoporotic bones become weak and fragile and can break from small forces that would normally be harmless.

 

 

But as well as loss of bone density and mass, osteoporotic bones may also be affected by abnormal changes to the structure of the bone matrix, which further contributes to weakness.

Osteoporosis is an extremely common bone disease, and women are more affected than men. As it is a progressive disorder that worsens with age, while the disease process might begin earlier, the effects are usually only noticed and diagnosed in people who are 50 years and older.

What are the Signs and Symptoms?

Often called a silent disease, many people will have no idea that they have the disease, as there are no obvious symptoms. In fact, sometimes the first sign that an individual has osteoporosis is when the first bone breaks. Along with fractures, which are the most serious signs of this disease, osteoporosis can cause the upper back to become excessively hunched (itself often a result of spinal wedge fractures) and there may be widespread pain as bony tissue is increasingly unable to withstand normal forces.

Fractures are a serious problem, especially in seniors. Bone breaks due to osteoporosis occur most frequently in the wrist, spine or hip. When the spine is affected by osteoporosis, people may develop a hunched or stooped posture. This can lead to respiratory issues and place pressure on the internal organs. Osteoporosis can severely impact a person’s mobility and independence, which can have an enormous impact on quality of life.

What Causes It?

As this is primarily a metabolic disorder, there are a variety of things that can cause osteoporosis if they either interfere with the body’s ability to either produce bone tissue or encourage excessive breakdown. This can be anything from gastrointestinal conditions that prevent absorption of calcium, lack of dietary calcium or low levels vitamin D, which is essential for absorption of calcium.

Certain medications may also cause bone loss especially if they are taken for a long time or in high doses. A good example is the long-term use of steroids. Although steroids are used to treat various conditions, it has been proven that steroids can cause bone loss and eventually, osteoporosis.

As bones respond to force and weight bearing by building more bone, having a sedentary lifestyle or doing activities with low impact (i.e. swimming, cycling) can also lead to osteoporosis.

How Can Physiotherapy Help?

Physiotherapy can help you avoid or recover from fractures and improve your overall bone health. Physiotherapy exercises can direct you to safely increase your weight bearing, which can help build bone mass. Balance training is also an important factor as this can reduce the risk of falls. Your physiotherapist can also educate you on how to adjust your lifestyle, at home or at work, to protect your bones and improve your posture.

This information is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Always see a medical professional for advice on your individual condition.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.