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My Health for Life – for a happier, healthier you

Do you want to improve your health and reduce the risk of developing a chronic disease? Then My Health for Life could be for you. It’s a free lifestyle program available to eligible participants.

Tell me more

We’re all different and joining a gym or having a special “diet” doesn’t work for everyone. Having support is also a big factor when it comes to staying healthy. My Health for Life is a health program underpinned by this understanding.

Whether you want to lose weight, be more active or live a healthier life, the My Health for Life program can give you the skills and support to achieve your goals. It’s a positive way to help you get your health back on track!

There are no costs involved

My Health for Life is funded by the Queensland Government, so it’s provided at no cost to participants.

It gives you a starting point for a healthier life

There isn’t a more perfect time to start living a healthier life than now. All you need to do is begin! The My Health for Life program gives you a starting point, a plan and the motivation to make healthier choices and kick some goals.

You have choice

You’ll be able to choose the health goal that’s most important to you. Then, our team at Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre will help you break that goal into easy, manageable steps and support you on your journey to action them.

The program is tailored to suit your needs

Health goals are personal – My Health for Life is underpinned by the understanding that everyone’s goal is different and personal to them.

Support is important for success

My Health for Life is about supporting your success. Our team at Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre will be there to help to motivate you and work with you to develop strategies to live a healthier life. We’ll also provide you with useful resources, tips and online tools for added support.

There’s an online Risk Checker

You can use the online health check to determine your personal risk of developing type 2 diabetes. You may be eligible to access My Health for Life or a number of other Government-funded programs that can assist you to reduce your risk.

Check Your Risk

 

     

Sounds great! Who’s eligible?

  • Those aged 45 years and over (18+ for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people) who have been identified by a health professional as being at high risk of type 2 Diabetes, heart disease or stroke
  • Those who are 18+ with a pre-existing condition, including: pre-diabetes, high blood pressure high cholesterol, or a previous history of gestational diabetes

How do I sign up?

  • Drop into our reception, where we can help you through the online check and confirm that you’re eligible. Then we can direct you straight into the program!
  • Take the health check at home on the My Health for Life website to check your eligibility
  • No referral from your doctor needed

What are the benefits?

  • You will receive 6 group sessions over a 6-month period
  • A one-on-one assessment at the beginning of the program
  • Wide range of support resources (including online support)
  • 6 months of follow up support upon program completion

Want to know more?

For more information on the My Health For Life program, phone Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre to speak with one of our facilitators on 5495 3255.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Where is your pain really coming from?

Have you ever been to see a physiotherapist for pain in one part of your body and, when they treated you, they focused on a completely different area?

While this can be a strange experience, it can be even more puzzling when the treatment actually works.

So what is going on? Shouldn’t pain be treated where it is being felt?

When pain is felt at a different location from where the pain is being caused, this is called ‘referred pain’ and is actually more common than you think. Exactly why this happens is a little complicated, and in fact, we don’t yet understand everything about the way that pain is processed.

Pain is usually felt when something causes damage to the body, sending an electrical impulse to the brain. The brain receives this information and process it to make sense of which part of the body the signal is coming from and what kind of pain it is.

When the brain thinks that the pain is coming from a different area than where the damage or signal is actually coming from, this creates the phenomenon of referred pain.

Referred Pain

Sometimes referred pain is easy to explain, such as when a nerve becomes injured or irritated, causing the pain to be felt along the length of the nerve. This often feels like a sharp, burning pain that runs in a strip, along the skin. Other examples of referred pain are more difficult to explain and in some cases seem to defy explanation. Perhaps you have heard about the strange phenomenon of phantom pain where amputees continue to feel pain as though it was in the place where their limbs used to be.

Muscular trigger points can also cause referred pain. The mechanism behind this is a bit trickier to understand, but is thought to be explained by tight bands of muscle tissues that cause pain to be felt in predictable patterns around the body.

Other tissues of the body can cause pain to be felt in a different location

This includes discs of the spine and internal organs. Many times the internal organs can refer pain in peculiar patterns and this can actually lead to serious illnesses being mistaken for muscular aches and pains.

Kidney pain can be felt in the lower back and tragically, some people fail to recognize that they are having a heart attack because they feel pain in their neck and arm, not in their chest.

We also know that not understanding or being afraid of pain can make pain feel stronger. In rare cases, people who have pain in one hand can feel pain just by seeing their other hand moving in a mirror.

There are many other fascinating aspects to pain, and understanding how it works is an important part of managing your symptoms.

To understand how referred pain may be affecting you, chat with one of our physiotherapists who can help answer your questions.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Ankle Sprains: can physiotherapy help?

What is an ankle sprain?

Almost everyone has twisted their ankle at some in their life; in fact, it is one of the most common reasons for people to visit an emergency department.

Technically an ankle sprain has occurred when an ankle twists, causing damage to one of it’s supporting ligaments. The ligaments can be overstretched, partially torn or completely ruptured, depending on the force of the injury. The ligament that is most often involved is the ATFL, or the anterior-talofibular ligament, located on the outside of the ankle.

While there are many ligaments surrounding and supporting the ankle, this ligament is the most vulnerable as it stops the ankle from rolling inwards, which is the way that most ankles are injured. Athletes who jump while moving in different directions, such as basketball players, are the most prone to this injury as they often land on their foot when it is not completely flat, twisting it and injuring the ligaments.

What are the signs and symptoms?

Most people won’t have any problem diagnosing that they have a sprained ankle. The symptoms are pain, swelling and tenderness over the area of damage, usually the outside of the ankle.

Depending on the severity of the injury, there may be bruising, reduced range of movement, instability and pain with weight bearing. In more severe injuries there may even be a loss of function, where you are unable to walk on the ankle and numbness and/or a feeling of coldness in the foot.

Why should I see a physiotherapist?

Twisted ankles can also cause a fracture of the ankle, not just ligament damage and many times a bad sprain and a fracture cannot be told apart without proper medical assessment and an X-ray. Your physiotherapist is able to identify if your sprain is severe enough to need further investigation to rule out a fracture.

They will also classify the severity of the sprain, providing you with a clear course of treatment. There are many factors that can lead someone to be more prone to fractures, including general hyper flexibility, unsupportive footwear and anatomical structure, however by far the most common reason for an ankle sprain is the existence of a previous sprain without complete rehabilitation.

This is because, following an ankle sprain, many people are left with weakness, instability or stiffness, reduced balance and proprioception – which is a sense of where your body is positioned. These things can mean that the next time your ankle is in a vulnerable position you don’t have the strength, awareness of position, balance or structural control to ensure it is in the correct position before putting all your weight through it, causing another injury.

As well as helping you reduce and recover from the pain and swelling of the injury in the early days. Your physiotherapist is trained to identify which issues are likely to affect you in the future and assist you with a personalized rehabilitation program to ensure your ankle is as strong and stable as possible to prevent future injuries.

The information in this newsletter is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Please contact the Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre for advice on your individual condition.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Pilates and injury prevention

Pilates is a whole body workout that is low impact and helps to tone and strengthen your body. Additionally, it can improve body alignment, posture, develop core stability, body awareness and improve neuromuscular control. All these factors are important to help prevent injuries or aid with rehabilitation after an injury.

Participating in Pilates is beneficial to all especially to help prevent injury. This is even more important for those participating in sports such as tennis, dance, soccer, footy etc. Some benefits include increased core strength and flexibility by adding an additional layer of protection and stability. It also allows athletes to move more efficiently and effectively within their sport and/or activity. When participating in Pilates, it has been proven that improved balance and co-ordination reduces the chances of injury occurring.

Pilates is also beneficial to help with general mobility, flexibility and improving your overall quality of life. It is a suitable for everyone, at all levels.

Participation in physical activity such as Pilates and other sports enhances social integration, aids in weight management, improves self-confidence, develops neuromuscular awareness and builds musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health (World Health Organization 2006).

With an increasing number of sports being promoted both in and outside of schools, we are seeing a rise in the risk of injuries. This makes injury prevention very important and beneficial for everyone of all ages and activities. Injury prevention has been proven to help with plyometrics, strength, balance and agility, all of which can be incorporated into a Pilates class.

Come along to the Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre for your individualised assessment. We’ll then get you into a suitable Pilates class, whether it’s for injury prevention, rehabilitation, or general exercise and maintenance.

You can read more about our Pilates classes here.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
What is referred pain?

Referred pain: What is it and how can I manage it?

What is referred pain?

Referred pain occurs when pain presents in one area but the cause and origin are located elsewhere. This occurs due to sensory nerves being impacted with too high or low a signal being sent through the central nervous system.

The central nervous system sends messages to soft tissue, bones and organs throughout the body, potentially impacting these areas. Referred pain can be reported as; an ache, deep pain, pins and needles, numbness, or as pain in a specific area. Alternatively, you may get referred pain due to muscles or even your organs.

What are the common types of referred pain?

There are common types of complaints which include referred pain, such as; headaches, low back pain and knee arthritis.
Headaches can be referred pain from tight muscles or nerves at the base of the skull, around to the top of the head, temples and the jaw with the symptoms originating from the joints or muscles within the neck.

Experiencing pain in the back of the leg could be due to the irritation of the sciatic nerve in the lower back. Alternatively, low back pain can refer into the hip, groin, leg(s) or further up your back.

Arthritic changes occur when cartilage within the joint wears away. For example; within the knee, pain can be referred around the knee or in other areas of the leg due to the exposure of nerves within these areas.

Muscles may refer pain. Typically from trigger points within the muscle belly due to overuse or underuse. This could be because of poor posture, lack of movement or abnormal movement patters. Trigger points have distinctive referral patterns throughout the body.

Organs within the body can also refer pain. This is often described as a deep ache. This pain often won’t have a set pattern and you can experience pain far away from the affected organ. For example; the heart causing pain in the neck and/ or arm.

To help find the cause or to manage your referred pain talk to your physiotherapist at Caboolture physical therapy centre who can help manage your symptoms and answer any questions that you may have.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.