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My Health for Life – for a happier, healthier you

Do you want to improve your health and reduce the risk of developing a chronic disease? Then My Health for Life could be for you. It’s a free lifestyle program available to eligible participants.

Tell me more

We’re all different and joining a gym or having a special “diet” doesn’t work for everyone. Having support is also a big factor when it comes to staying healthy. My Health for Life is a health program underpinned by this understanding.

Whether you want to lose weight, be more active or live a healthier life, the My Health for Life program can give you the skills and support to achieve your goals. It’s a positive way to help you get your health back on track!

There are no costs involved

My Health for Life is funded by the Queensland Government, so it’s provided at no cost to participants.

It gives you a starting point for a healthier life

There isn’t a more perfect time to start living a healthier life than now. All you need to do is begin! The My Health for Life program gives you a starting point, a plan and the motivation to make healthier choices and kick some goals.

You have choice

You’ll be able to choose the health goal that’s most important to you. Then, our team at Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre will help you break that goal into easy, manageable steps and support you on your journey to action them.

The program is tailored to suit your needs

Health goals are personal – My Health for Life is underpinned by the understanding that everyone’s goal is different and personal to them.

Support is important for success

My Health for Life is about supporting your success. Our team at Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre will be there to help to motivate you and work with you to develop strategies to live a healthier life. We’ll also provide you with useful resources, tips and online tools for added support.

There’s an online Risk Checker

You can use the online health check to determine your personal risk of developing type 2 diabetes. You may be eligible to access My Health for Life or a number of other Government-funded programs that can assist you to reduce your risk.

Check Your Risk

 

     

Sounds great! Who’s eligible?

  • Those aged 45 years and over (18+ for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people) who have been identified by a health professional as being at high risk of type 2 Diabetes, heart disease or stroke
  • Those who are 18+ with a pre-existing condition, including: pre-diabetes, high blood pressure high cholesterol, or a previous history of gestational diabetes

How do I sign up?

  • Drop into our reception, where we can help you through the online check and confirm that you’re eligible. Then we can direct you straight into the program!
  • Take the health check at home on the My Health for Life website to check your eligibility
  • No referral from your doctor needed

What are the benefits?

  • You will receive 6 group sessions over a 6-month period
  • A one-on-one assessment at the beginning of the program
  • Wide range of support resources (including online support)
  • 6 months of follow up support upon program completion

Want to know more?

For more information on the My Health For Life program, phone Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre to speak with one of our facilitators on 5495 3255.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Where is your pain really coming from?

Have you ever been to see a physiotherapist for pain in one part of your body and, when they treated you, they focused on a completely different area?

While this can be a strange experience, it can be even more puzzling when the treatment actually works.

So what is going on? Shouldn’t pain be treated where it is being felt?

When pain is felt at a different location from where the pain is being caused, this is called ‘referred pain’ and is actually more common than you think. Exactly why this happens is a little complicated, and in fact, we don’t yet understand everything about the way that pain is processed.

Pain is usually felt when something causes damage to the body, sending an electrical impulse to the brain. The brain receives this information and process it to make sense of which part of the body the signal is coming from and what kind of pain it is.

When the brain thinks that the pain is coming from a different area than where the damage or signal is actually coming from, this creates the phenomenon of referred pain.

Referred Pain

Sometimes referred pain is easy to explain, such as when a nerve becomes injured or irritated, causing the pain to be felt along the length of the nerve. This often feels like a sharp, burning pain that runs in a strip, along the skin. Other examples of referred pain are more difficult to explain and in some cases seem to defy explanation. Perhaps you have heard about the strange phenomenon of phantom pain where amputees continue to feel pain as though it was in the place where their limbs used to be.

Muscular trigger points can also cause referred pain. The mechanism behind this is a bit trickier to understand, but is thought to be explained by tight bands of muscle tissues that cause pain to be felt in predictable patterns around the body.

Other tissues of the body can cause pain to be felt in a different location

This includes discs of the spine and internal organs. Many times the internal organs can refer pain in peculiar patterns and this can actually lead to serious illnesses being mistaken for muscular aches and pains.

Kidney pain can be felt in the lower back and tragically, some people fail to recognize that they are having a heart attack because they feel pain in their neck and arm, not in their chest.

We also know that not understanding or being afraid of pain can make pain feel stronger. In rare cases, people who have pain in one hand can feel pain just by seeing their other hand moving in a mirror.

There are many other fascinating aspects to pain, and understanding how it works is an important part of managing your symptoms.

To understand how referred pain may be affecting you, chat with one of our physiotherapists who can help answer your questions.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
What is referred pain?

Referred pain: What is it and how can I manage it?

What is referred pain?

Referred pain occurs when pain presents in one area but the cause and origin are located elsewhere. This occurs due to sensory nerves being impacted with too high or low a signal being sent through the central nervous system.

The central nervous system sends messages to soft tissue, bones and organs throughout the body, potentially impacting these areas. Referred pain can be reported as; an ache, deep pain, pins and needles, numbness, or as pain in a specific area. Alternatively, you may get referred pain due to muscles or even your organs.

What are the common types of referred pain?

There are common types of complaints which include referred pain, such as; headaches, low back pain and knee arthritis.
Headaches can be referred pain from tight muscles or nerves at the base of the skull, around to the top of the head, temples and the jaw with the symptoms originating from the joints or muscles within the neck.

Experiencing pain in the back of the leg could be due to the irritation of the sciatic nerve in the lower back. Alternatively, low back pain can refer into the hip, groin, leg(s) or further up your back.

Arthritic changes occur when cartilage within the joint wears away. For example; within the knee, pain can be referred around the knee or in other areas of the leg due to the exposure of nerves within these areas.

Muscles may refer pain. Typically from trigger points within the muscle belly due to overuse or underuse. This could be because of poor posture, lack of movement or abnormal movement patters. Trigger points have distinctive referral patterns throughout the body.

Organs within the body can also refer pain. This is often described as a deep ache. This pain often won’t have a set pattern and you can experience pain far away from the affected organ. For example; the heart causing pain in the neck and/ or arm.

To help find the cause or to manage your referred pain talk to your physiotherapist at Caboolture physical therapy centre who can help manage your symptoms and answer any questions that you may have.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
Caboolture Physio_Hip injuries_Femoroacetabular Impingement

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

What is it?

When the two surfaces of the hip joint move over each other, they usually move freely without any friction. If there is an alteration to either the socket part of the joint (the acetabulum) or the ball (the head of the femur), irritation may occur as the two surfaces move over each other. This is known as Femoroacetabular impingement, a common disorder of the hip, characterized by pain and stiffness.

Femoroacetabular impingement can be classified as cam, pincer or mixed. A cam FAI occurs when the femoral head junction is flattened or a small bump is present. Pincer type of impingement occurs when the acetabular rim extends slightly, causing the femur to be impacted. Cam impingement is more common in men while pincer impingement is more common in women. However, most cases of FAI (about 85%) are mixed, meaning they both have cam and pincer types of impingement.

What are the symptoms of FAI?

The most common symptom of FAI is pain located in the hip or groin when resting in certain positions of with specific movements. Some patients also report pain in the back, buttock or thigh. Other symptoms include stiffness, loss of movement range (particularly of the hip), locking, clicking or a feeling that the hip is about to give way.

Activities that cause the incongruous surfaces to move over each other repeatedly are naturally the main culprits for causing symptoms. These can include prolonged sitting, twisting, sitting with crossed legs, squatting and climbing stairs can all aggravate the pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement.

What are the causes?

There are many factors that may cause an individual to develop femoroacetabular impingement including;

  • Hip dysplasia or malformation during infancy/childhood
  • Repetitive stress on the hip
  • A femoral neck fracture that did not heal properly (malunion)
  • Small bony growths around the joint called osteophytes
  • Normal anatomical variation

How can physiotherapy help?

Femoroacetabular impingement is a complex condition and researchers are still determining the best possible treatment. It is thought that untreated FAI can lead to osteoarthritis of the hip down the track and there are both surgical and non-surgical options for treatment. Conservative (non-surgical) management for FAI involves core stability training, strengthening exercises for the lower limb specifically the hip and postural balance exercises. This program aims to improve the hip’s neuromuscular function.

A hydrotherapy program can also help as it reduces weight through the joint, making movements more comfortable. Lastly, a home exercise program is made for patients, so they can continue treatment at home. For many people, physiotherapy is enough to resolve their symptoms and prevent future problems, however, others may require surgery.

With surgery, hip arthroscopy is the most common procedure for this disorder and is used to change the shape of the joint slightly so that there are no points of irritation with movement. After surgery, patients are usually referred to physiotherapy for rehabilitation.

The information in this newsletter is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Please contact our reception for advice on your individual condition.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
What does a physio do?

What does a physiotherapist do?

Many people know the value that physiotherapy brings to their life and some have even been visiting their physiotherapist since childhood.

However, for those who have never been to see a physiotherapist before, there can be a question mark over exactly what it is that physiotherapists do. In fact, this is one of the most common questions physiotherapists are asked.

What is it that physiotherapists do?

The answer is tricky because physiotherapists do so much. Primarily, we might be described as pain management experts, as we work to reduce the pain of our patients, from those who have suffered a new injury, to those who have had pain for several years. We first identify the cause of the pain and then provide manual therapy techniques, education and management strategies to help our patient understand, manage and reduce their pain.

While pain is usually the first thing that brings patients to see a physiotherapist, this pain has often caused patients to give up activities that they love and can even be getting in the way of everyday tasks. Many of us reduce our activity levels to reduce pain without even realizing it. Physiotherapists are able to identify which areas you are struggling in and why this is occurring. By identifying the cause of your symptoms, we can help to get you back to full function. Physiotherapists are able to do this for everyone including elite athletes and those dealing with serious disabilities.

In fact, physiotherapists have a role to play at practically every stage of life.  We can assess infants to monitor their motor skills development and as they grow we help them deal with the pains and vulnerabilities of a growing body. Among other things, we can help improve the function of athletes, assist in preventing injuries, help those with pelvic floor dysfunction and work to prevent falls in the elderly.

Not just exercises and massage.

Physiotherapists offer a range of treatments, from targeted stretches, manual therapies, dry needling, exercises and massage. Physiotherapists are also committed educators and take our role as such seriously.

A huge part of recovering from pain and injury comes from understanding what is happening and how to best manage these issues. Rather than create a dependency on their therapist, we aim to empower our patients to improve their health independently as much as possible.

Physiotherapists aim, to improve your quality of life and remove any barriers to full participation, whether these barriers are due to pain, weakness or stiffness.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre – serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.