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Posturing Yourself to Feel Better

Posturing Yourself to Feel Better

Being told to stand up straight is a rite of passage for most teenagers. New research is showing that there is more to gain from having good posture than just a healthy spine. Your posture and body language have now been shown to affect the way you feel. Most people recognize that when you’re unhappy or tired you naturally slouch and when you’re feeling confident your shoulders are set back and you have a spring in your step.

What is more difficult to understand is that the reverse is also true. It seems that your posture can also affect your mood. In a recent study, people who adopted a posture of confidence for two minutes before a job interview reported feeling more confident and actually performed better in the interview than people who adopted low confidence postures for the same period of time.

You already knew that a good posture could make you feel better but this adds a whole new dimension to the issue. It also seems that you actually can run away from your problems. A study of college students suffering from mild to moderate depression showed improvement of their mood after starting a jogging program. When they were compared to students who took anti-depressants instead, they found the jogging students felt better quicker with fewer side effects.

By no means is exercise a replacement for supervised treatment, but it has a very useful place. Patients who combine high intensity exercise with other treatment types are also less likely to have recurring episodes of depression than those who don’t.

So along with less pain, increased strength, lower risk of heart disease, obesity, diabetes and osteoporosis, you can add mental well being to the list of reasons to move well and stay active.

Posturing Yourself to Feel Better

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
Separated Shoulder (AC Joint Sprain)

Separated Shoulder (AC Joint Sprain)

WHAT IS IT?

The Acromioclavicular  (AC) Joint is the joint between the collarbone and the shoulder blade. It is the only bony joint attaching the upper arm to the body and is essential in transferring forces from the arm to the trunk. To keep the joint stable it is reinforced by three thick ligaments; the Acromioclavicular, Coracoclavicular and Coracoacromial ligaments.

HOW DOES IT BECOME SEPARATED?

A tear of the AC joint usually occurs from force directly on the shoulder, often from falling, car accidents or tackles during sport. As with all injuries, there are different degrees of injury. With mild injuries, only a few fibres are torn or stretched. In very severe injuries the collarbone and shoulder blade are completely dislocated. This injury is referred to as ‘separated shoulder’.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

After an AC joint injury there is usually immediate pain on the top of the shoulder, swelling and bruising. There is often loss of movement of the shoulder, and pain from putting weight through the arm or carrying heavy objects. In severe cases there is a visible lump on top of the shoulder, known as a ‘step deformity’.

To confirm the diagnosis, your physiotherapist can perform some simple tests. An X-ray can help to grade the severity of the injury.

Separated Shoulder (AC Joint Sprain)HOW CAN PHYSIO HELP?

The first line of treatment is RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) to minimize inflammation over the first 48 hours. Ultrasound and NSAIDS can also be used to reduce swelling.

After this initial period it is important to note that a severe sprain of the AC joint puts quite a lot of stress on the muscles that support the shoulder. The role of physiotherapy in this case is to ensure the joint is supported and given a chance to heal naturally, while maintaining the strength and normal movement of the shoulder girdle.

This is done initially by providing support to the joint. You may need to have your arm supported in a sling or brace for some of this time and your physiotherapist can show you some taping techniques to add support. Heat and ultrasound are other treatments which can speed up healing.

To maintain the health of the surrounding muscles, your physiotherapist will prescribe exercises, ensure the muscles keep a normal length and treat any trigger points.

Most AC joint sprains take six weeks to fully heal, although many patients report shoulder problems in future years. For this reason a comprehensive rehabilitation program is very important. Very severe sprains are often treated with surgery to reattach the joint and treat any possible fracture.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
sports injury prevention and treatment

Are you ready for the Footy Season?

It’s finally that time of year again – the footy season is about to kick off! Unfortunately, the nature of the sport brings its fair share of injuries with it too. In my experience working with various footy clubs, these are the most common injuries that I’ve encountered – and how to help prevent them.

Concussion: This is a complex process which affects the brain, and is induced by traumatic mechanical forces – most commonly a direct blow to the head. Concussion is common in all contact sports, with professional horse jumping jockeys and AFL players having the highest rate of concussion of any sport. At the present time, it is theorized that the severity of a concussion can be reduced by improving the condition of the neck musculature. Although this will not prevent head injury, it is thought that properly conditioned neck muscles are able to absorb and withstand some of the force that occurs with impact.

ACL & MCL (knee ligament) sprain/tear: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located within the knee joint, and functions to prevent excess movement of the tibia (shin bone) on the femur (thigh bone). It is also imperative for control of rotational movement. The ACL is most commonly injured when landing from a jump, pivoting, or during sudden deceleration. Typically, a ‘pop’, ‘snap’ or ‘tear’ is felt or heard when the ACL is completely ruptured.
The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is located on the inner aspect of the knee, and provides support to the side of the knee where it connects the femur and the tibia. The MCL can be injured with a forceful blow to the sports injury prevention and treatmentoutermost part of the knee.

Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength are necessary for optimal knee control; particularly the ability to co-contract them. Balance and proprioception (the joint’s ability to know where it is in space) is also essential for knee control. This gives us the ability to walk, run and jump without having to look at where our legs and feet are. This function is often lost with joint injuries, particularly in the lower limbs.

Ankle sprains: This injury usually occurs when the ankle is ‘rolled’, which implicates the ligaments functioning to hold the joint in a stable position. Around 9/10 ankle sprains will affect the outside ankle. Studies have shown that balance and proprioception exercises (outlined above) and ankle taping/bracing are effective in preventing recurrent ankle sprains. At the present time, it is unknown which preventative methods are effective for first-time ankle sprains.

For each of these injuries, your physio will be able to conduct a thorough assessment of your area of concern, and tailor an exercise program specific to your needs.

Kate Reardon.
Physiotherapist

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
back pain relief

Surprising Conditions Your Physiotherapist Can Help With

back pain reliefMuscle tears, ankle sprains, back pain, headaches and shoulder pain. These are all commonly treated physiotherapy problems and chances are, if you suffer from one of them, you’re either seeing a physiotherapist or putting it off.
Most people know how physiotherapy can help them with common injuries, particularly those involving the muscles and the joints. What you probably don’t know is that your physiotherapist has been trained to treat a huge variety of conditions. Some of them might surprise you.

Respiratory Problems

Physiotherapists are one of the first ports of call to help clear a chest infection, particularly for the very young, elderly and those with chronic conditions such as cystic fibrosis. Your physiotherapist is able to assist with drainage, breathing cycles and physical percussion techniques to help you breathe easier.

Vertigo

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is a specific type of vertigo caused by loose micro crystals in the inner ear, resulting in dizziness when the head is turned in different positions. Your physiotherapist can give you exercises to relocate these crystals and regain your balance.
Physiotherapists can also help with habituation exercises for other types of vertigo.

Neurological Conditions

Strokes, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries and head injuries are all conditions that your physiotherapist has been trained to treat. In the private practice setting they are particularly helpful at stretching the tight muscles affected and providing specially tailored strengthening exercises.

Incontinence

For one in three women, incontinence is an ongoing problem after childbirth, and one that has a huge impact on quality of life. Your physiotherapist is well versed in teaching pelvic floor exercises, which can help you regain control.

Developmental Delays, balance and Incoordination

For some children, balance and coordination don’t come easily. Your physiotherapist is able to prescribe exercises to assist with improving balance and coordination for people of any age.

More surprising conditions your physiotherapist can help with:

  • Fibromyalgia
  • Osteo- and Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Lymphoedema
  • Osteoporosis
  • Falls associated with aging
  • Scar tissue healing
  • Jaw pain
  • Post-surgical rehabilitation
Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
chick-pea-salad

Foods that fight Inflammation

Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response; without it, we can’t heal. But when it is out of control- it can damage the body. Foods high in sugar and saturated fat can spur inflammation. They cause over activity in the immune system, leading to Joint pain, damage to the blood vessels and fatigue.