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Spotlight on Dry Needling

What is dry needling?

Dry Needling is similar to Acupuncture, where needles are used as a part of your physiotherapy treatment and put into different places within the body.

In Acupuncture, needles are placed in specific points within the body for various reasons. In dry needling, the needles are placed within muscles to release trigger points to help with muscular pain and dysfunction.

Trigger points are tight areas of muscle, which can form due to pain, poor posture and movement pattern or repetitive movement.

What are the benefits of Dry Needling?

Needling promotes blood flow to the area, bringing oxygen to injured tissues, helping to reduce inflammation and swelling. Dry needling also promotes the release of pain-relieving endorphins, reducing the pain levels and therefore the need for pain relief medications. It can also help release trigger points within the muscles which may be causing your local pain or any referred pain in other areas of your body.

Dry needling can help to treat a range of musculoskeletal injuries such as; lower back pain, chronic headaches, knee pain, shoulder impingement and sports injuries.

For more information, speak to your physiotherapist on your next visit to discuss your options for treatment.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

The hidden benefits of learning a new skill

When thinking about getting fit and exercising more, our first thoughts are usually that we should join a gym or start jogging. While these are both worthwhile activities, studies show that if you dislike the activity you’re doing, the long-term benefits are usually not enough to keep you committed. There are a few things that are often overlooked when talking about exercising more, particularly the fact that you can often improve your life in more than one way if you find the right activity.

Finding the right activity can boost your confidence and increase your daily activity levels.

We all have different tastes in food and the same is true for exercise. Some of us chase the thrill of learning a new skill; others prefer the challenge of pushing their limits of endurance while others love being surrounded by nature. Exercise is good for everyone, but finding the right activity for you is going to make it much easier to make it a committed part of your lifestyle.

We are also more likely to enjoy doing activities that we are good at. Some people have great balance, while others have great hand-eye coordination, others have great rhythm and someone who is an excellent dancer might be a terrible runner. Consider what you are personally good at and try to choose your activity based on this. Finding something that suits your routine is also an important component to making a new activity a part of your lifestyle.

Sometimes it is simply a lack of imagination that fails to get us off the couch. Jogging’s not for everyone, but one of these sports might be. Here’s a quick list of less common activities that you may not have thought of trying: rock-climbing, volleyball, soccer, hula-hooping, slacklining, golf, mountain biking, hiking, standup paddle boarding, roller skating, skateboarding, dancing, Pilates and yoga, just to name a few.

Learning new skills can be good for your brain.

Many people think that as they get older, learning new skills becomes too hard. The truth is, that with a bit of patience, you can surprise yourself with your ability to learn new things at any age. The brain is capable of incredible change and adaptation to new stimulus. Learning new things can be a great source of confidence and exercise has been shown to improve your brain function overall.

Many activities can help you meet new people and open you up to new communities.

Even solo sports often have well-connected communities. Surfers have surf clubs, or often meet each other in the water, rock climbers are always looking for more people to take adventures with and people who wake up at 5am to do boot camp together become great friends. As we leave high school and university, it can be harder to create new social connections. Using exercise as a way to make new friends can have a significant impact on your overall wellbeing. In many activities, the communities are extremely supportive of beginners and you might be surprised at how friendly they are to newcomers.

Ask one of our expert physios for advice on which activities might suit your ability level and tips to ensure you stay injury free when starting your new hobby!

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.

Patella Dislocations: What are they and how can your physio help?

What is it?

The knee joint is composed of the thigh bone, (femur) and leg bone (tibia) and a small floating bone at the front, commonly known as the kneecap (patella). The interaction between these bones allows for smooth movement of the knee as it bends and straightens.

During movement, the kneecap sits in a groove at the front of the knee and acts as a mechanical see-saw. This protects the knee joint and improves the efficiency of the muscles working to move it. When the patella moves out of this groove it is called a subluxation. If the patella moves far enough out of this groove it becomes a dislocation.

What are the symptoms?

The first time the patella dislocates is usually the most traumatic and painful. The knee may give way, and a visible lump can be noticed where the patella has dislocated. There will often be bruising, swelling and the knee may feel unstable. First-time dislocations may also cause a heamarthrosis or bleeding within the knee joint. If there is damage to the ligaments of the knee, subsequent dislocations can happen more easily, and from everyday activities, causing the knee to give way suddenly.

What are the causes?

First-time dislocations often occur due to a traumatic event. The most common cause of patellar dislocation is a non-contact injury to the knee with a twist of the leg (the thigh bone rotates internally on a fixed leg and foot). In addition, a direct blow to the side of the knee can also dislocate the patella.

If there is some instability of the joint, dislocations can occur more regularly and from smaller forces.

Dislocations usually occur when the knee is bent and the kneecap slips back into place when the knee is straightened again. While the kneecap can be dislocated in both directions, it usually dislocates towards the outside of the knee.

Certain factors can make dislocation more likely, including overall hyper-flexibility, damage to the ligaments of the knee and muscular imbalance of the quadriceps. The structure and angle of the knee joint itself can also make dislocation more likely. This can be seen in the increased prevalence of dislocations for women as they have a slightly different angle of femur compared to the tibia than men. A traumatic dislocation can cause instability that can lead to future dislocations.

How can physiotherapy help?

An acute patellar dislocation should be treated like any traumatic injury and assessed by a medical professional to reduce pain and swelling, make an accurate diagnosis and check for fractures. While the kneecap may relocate itself quickly, ensuring that it is able to heal correctly to prevent further dislocations may require immobilization for up to six weeks.

Your physiotherapist will be able to identify any factors that may predispose you to further dislocations and provide you with a personalized treatment program to address any stiffness, weakness or instability surrounding the knee. Balance and proprioception (your sense of where your body is in space) are often reduced following an injury and your physiotherapist will help to rehabilitate these. Your therapist may provide you with education and advice regarding bracing or taping. In severe cases of instability, surgery may be recommended to stabilize the knee however this is usually not considered unless there has been a fracture or until a full rehabilitation with physiotherapy has been completed.

This info is not a replacement for proper medical advice. Please get in touch with one of our expert physios for advice on your individual condition.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
Workplace Ergonomics and your working posture

Workplace Ergonomics 101 – Your working posture

With an increasing number of jobs requiring you to sit in front of a computer for long periods of the day, it is important to address your working posture to protect your spinal health.

Here are a few simple adjustments that you can make to your workstation to help improve and protect your spinal health. Start with: 

  1. Adjusting your seat height so that your forearms can rest comfortably on the desk with your elbows at a 90-degree angle.
  2. Support your lower spine with the lumbar support of the chair sitting in the curve of your lower back.
  3. Have the screen/monitor sitting at a suitable height to prevent pushing your chin forward or having to look down to see the screen. (At a minimum, the bottom of the screen should be at eye level or slightly above).
  4. Where possible, try to have documents resting on an angled stand rather than sitting on the desk. This will prevent hunching over to read.
  5. Remember to take short breaks throughout the day. Stand up and stretch, this will assist in managing any lower back pain.

These are just a few strategies to prevent postural issues or spinal pain, our physiotherapists can offer further advice specific to each individual’s needs.

We also offer workplace ergonomic assessments, where our therapists will come to your work and assess your workstation. For more information, or to make a booking, phone one of our friendly staff on 5495 3255.

Below is an example of correct work posture:

Workplace Ergonomics 101

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.
At Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre, we can help ease your back and pelvis pain during Pregnancy

Pelvis and low back pain in pregnancy

Lumbar spine and pelvic girdle pain commonly affects roughly 50% or pregnant women. The severity and intensity of the pain vary between individuals and has the potential to have a negative impact on activities of daily living.

Symptoms often start around the 20th to the 28th week, however individual cases may vary.

The pain can occur for a number of reasons, including:

  • Hormonal changes
  • Postural changes
  • Separation of the abdominal muscles
  • Increased stress on the lower back

During pregnancy, the hormone relaxin (see below) is released which allows the soft tissue structures (such as; ligament and tendons) to relax preparing the body for a pregnancy (childbearing). When this occurs, it can target all areas allowing instability around the joints, which can lead to pain. As your baby grows, you change the way you move and carry yourself, due to changes in your centre of gravity. Consequently, this can cause additional stress and strain to joints in the pelvis and back.

The growth and development of your baby stretches the rectus abdominis and may cause these muscles to separate. This separation may increase as your baby continues to grow.

To help reduce and manage your symptoms both during and after your pregnancy, see your physiotherapist at Caboolture physical therapy for individualised assessment, treatment and advice.

Relaxin is a hormone produced by the ovary and the placenta with important effects in the female reproductive system and during pregnancy. In preparation for childbirth, it relaxes the ligaments in the pelvis and softens and widens the cervix.

Caboolture Physical Therapy Centre - serving people in need from the following areas: Caboolture, Morayfield, Elimbah, Wamuran, Beerburrum, Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains, Toorbul, Donnybrook, Ningi, Woodford, Kilcoy, Bribie Island, Goodwin Beach, Sandstone Point, Banksia Beach, Bongaree, Bellar, Woorim, Burpengary & Beachmere.